Fish to Catch From Whitby Piers in December

Arriving in Whitby on a cold December evening to fish the piers you can find plenty of accommodation like the Arches or Ashford Guest Houses. The George Hotel situated very close to the harbour side also caters for fishermen and provides freezer space for your catch until your departure date.

There is nothing like staying in a nice hospitable place when you have been out fishing in the cold depths of winter.

Fishing on the Whitby Piers really should be getting into it’s own in December. By the end of November and the beginning of December then hopefully the cod fishing should really be getting better. At the start of December we would normally expect some very good fishing with good size whiting and codling getting caught. Unfortunately this year the season has started slowly, mainly due to the weather patterns in my opinion. We have only just started to get the first cold snap of the season, so water temperatures have been higher than you would expect at this time of the year. Things do now appear to be looking up with a recent good Northerly blow that has stirred the sea and given it a bit of colour, coupled with a cold spell we might at last have turned the corner.

There have been a few good reports of fish being caught from all along the N/east coast so hopefully this will continue.

Both piers at whitby fish well but most folk seem to keep to the left hand pier, probably because it is a bit more accessible than the far pier and at the moment you can’t access the far end of the pier due to some sea damage. During December when fishing for both cod and whiting I would always ‘tip’ one of my worm baits with a bit of mackerel strip, normally a good bait for whiting.

I normally only eat whiting by making fishcakes – a lovely tasty fish for making these. My family and especially the kids, love them. The trick with whiting that I have always found best, is to boil them first before using them in fishcakes. If you try to fillet them, they are a boney fish and have loads of small bones but if you boil them for a short while first, you can just peel the flesh off the bone and it makes it a whole lot simpler to use.

Peeler crab is a top bait for cod at the beginning of the season before Xmas but after at the start of the year I would normally prefer Rag or Lug. My preferred worm bait has always been ragworm, many, many would disagree I know, saying big black lug or ‘yellow tails’ fish better. Everyone to their own but I always preferred ragworm for a few reasons. In very cold weather, and I have fished Whitby pier when it was minus 10 degrees, ragworm will stay alive longer than lug, lug tends to freeze when it is really bitter and I have had ragworm freeze to be fair, but it will last longer. Ragworm is also a tougher bait and will stay on the hook a bit longer than lug in rough weather. I have always loved ‘rock fishing’ and found rag to be tougher and a better bait than lug. Like I say earlier, everyone to their own.

I remember one night when we fished Whitby east pier, every time we reeled in the ice was coming off the line onto your fingers as you guided the line back onto the reel! Might not sound bad but believe me at 2 or 3 in the morning when your cold and hungry, it hurts! The worms froze solid.

‘Coalies’ will also be about but again I’ve had better luck catching them just down the road at Sandsend in the car park. They can sometimes be to a good size too and they will normally put up a spirited fight.

If you fish into the harbour off either of the Whitby piers then eels and flatties are probably the mainstay here. Lug tipped with a bit of mackerel will account for flatties at any time of the year. The far pier has kelp beds and rough ground casting out to sea but it does throw up some really good cod in the right conditions.

Mussel and razor are two very underated baits as far as I am concerned, they both fish well and mussel fishes very well after a good storm when the sea is dropping off and has a good colour to it.

‘Darn Sarf’ they are rarely seen and I have had many a discussion about the pro’s and con’s of using mussel. A lot of the guys stick to big blow lug or ‘blacks’ and won’t use anything else. One of the guys I sometimes fish with is like that, won’t use anything else besides big lug, possibly tipped off with squid, another underated bait. I have out fished him using rag and other combinations, he has outfished me on many occasions as well but until you try something, who is to know whether it will work or not?

I often keep a few mussel in a jar wrapped in elasticated cotton ready to use. I have found it better to do it this way than to try loading a hook when your hands are cold and wet. Plus if they have been in a jar for a while, they tend to smell a bit more and I believe the smellier or rancid the better to be honest.

I’m not putting myself up as an expert on the subject but with over 40 years of experience behind me, fishing a lot of area’s around the English coast, I think I know a little about the subject. I did fish the N/east coast for around 20 years on a very regular basis. Only being limited by “Her who must be obeyed” as most of us are!

It’s always a good idea to phone one of the local tackle shops to see how the fishing is doing and you can always book some top class bait at the same time.

One thing I would say here is remember, if you are going to fish off a pier, breakwater or jetty of any type. The last thing you need to happen is loose that fish of the season when trying to lift it up the side. Get yourself a decent ‘drop net’, you can either buy one or make one, quite easy to do out of an old bike wheel! Many years ago off Saltburn pier I lost a fish that I estimated to be around the 20lb mark, got it half way up the pier and it fell off.

I know it is quite easy to over estimate but I have always believed that the only person you are kidding is yourself so no point in exaggerating! I had a 3lb cod under that one and didn’t even know it was there until the ‘lump’ dropped off.

I always carry a net now if I am fishing piers or jetties or a gaff if I am fishing off a steep beach, I have no intention of losing a good fish again and never have. How many times do you read on the forum’s or in the angling press about the fish that came off in the surf when someone was trying to beach it.

Whitby is a great place to be if you want to catch some fish in December.



Source by John Staten

Rainbow Trout Bait – The Top 3 Baits For Catching Bigger Rainbows

As a person who has been fishing for and catching rainbow trout for more than twenty five years, I am well aware of the fact that these beautiful fish are a ton of fun to catch, but catching large trout (twenty inches and above) can be a challenge. Not only are large trout more experienced and thus weary than their average sized cousins, they are also a challenge to land when they are hooked because of their size. Below I will draw upon my extensive experience to outline the top 3 baits to use if you want to catch more and bigger rainbow trout this fishing season.

Keep in mind, as a general rule big rainbows prefer big meals so up sizing your the bait that you are using is never a bad idea. For example, rather than using a 2-3 inch crank bait, try up sizing the same crank bait and using a 4-5 inch version. Large trout want to expend as little energy as possible to get a meal, so they often look for something big when they are feeding. The following baits are being listed in no particular order.

Large Streamers – Streamers that are 4 inches long (or even a bit longer) are often used to target large trout by   fly  fishermen and this is with good reason, because they are effective. The goal is to imitate the main bait fish on the particular body of water that you are fishing, so match your streamer to whatever this bait fish might be for you and the water that you are fishing. Baby rainbow, rabbit strip leaches, and wooly buggers would be examples of a few effective streamers for big rainbow trout on many bodes of water.

Large Worms – When most people use live worms as rainbow trout bait they use red worms, leaf worms, or mini night crawlers. When large rainbow trout are the goal a large worm, such as a whole night crawler, is the way to go. This is true in rivers as well as in lakes, and many veteran rainbow fishermen like to inflate their worm when fishing in a lake so that it floats above the bottom and is easy for large rainbows to locate.

Crayfish – My trout fishing mentor used to say that the best bait for large rainbows was a live crayfish that was 2-3 inches long, and I often used to catch crayfish this size so that he could use them for bait for large rainbows. I have found that this fact is certainly true, but have also found live crayfish difficult to use effectively. So what I do is use crayfish patterned  flies  or crank baits when I’m in search of large rainbow trout.

The bottom line is that when it comes to rainbow trout bait the three aforementioned choices need to be a part of your arsenal if big rainbow trout are your goal. They have all served me well over the years and I know they will do the same for you.



Source by Trevor Kugler

Of Worms, Flies, and Antidepressants

You may think that scientists know everything there is about antidepressant drugs such as Prozac or fluoxetine (its generic name). After all, these drugs have been around for a while. Fluoxetine-like antidepressants are known for their selective inhibition of proteins called serotonin transporters, which sequester the active neurochemical serotonin back into cells (thus the term SSRI or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor). Surprisingly, it is still debatable whether this molecular activity of SSRIs is solely responsible for their therapeutic effects. Hence, molecular research typically conducted in a Petri dish or in experimental animals including worms (C. elegans) and fruit  flies  (Drosophila melanogaster) has been looking for alternative explanations.

Worms and fruit  flies  have proved useful whole-organism models for genetic research. More recently, these tiny animals have started to provide us with hints on the genetic mechanisms of human brain disorders and have become increasingly useful in the search for new molecular targets in drug discovery.

Some ten years ago, a group of geneticists stumbled upon the notion that Prozac makes worms wrinkle their noses. These scientists tried to find the molecular reason for this unexpected action of the drug. It turned out to be a gene family, which when mutated diminished the nose muscle contractions caused by Prozac. They named the gene family nose resistant to fluoxetine, or NRF. Scientists hoped that by identifying the proteins made by the worm NRF genes they would be able to find a corresponding human protein, which they could investigate as a new target of Prozac’s action, a target different from the already known serotonin transporter. Unfortunately there was no known human counterpart.

Dr. Svetlana Dzitoyeva from the University of Illinois at Chicago noted similarities between the DNA sequence of NRF genes and a sequence found in fruit  fly  DNA. She and colleagues hypothesized that this fruit  fly  DNA sequence could be a gene similar to NRF. If they could identify that fruit  fly  gene, they might be able to pinpoint its human counterpart and possibly discover a new target for antidepressant action.

Active genes make gene-specific messenger RNAs; these mRNAs lead to the production of corresponding proteins. Dzitoyeva and colleagues have developed a method for identifying new active genes in which they inject anesthetized fruit  flies  with molecules called dsRNA. These dsRNA molecules can be designed to destroy any particular mRNA. As a result, the injected  fly  loses its targeted endogenous mRNA. For all practical purposes, this treated  fly  would behave as if the corresponding gene was inactivated. Looking at the cellular or behavioral consequences of such gene silencing, scientists can tell what the function of the corresponding gene would be.

Dzitoyeva and colleagues designed a dsRNA against the fruit  fly  sequence similar to the worm nose resistant to fluoxetine and succeeded in finding a functional new fruit  fly  gene. They saw its activity in different tissues including the  fly  brain. Silencing this gene in  fly  embryos created a loss of developmental markers know as belts. So they named the new gene beltless.

Unfortunately, fruit  flies  differed from worms in that they did not have any obvious behavioral responses when given Prozac. There was no  fly  behavior that would correspond to the Prozac nose twitches in worms. Since Dzitoyeva and colleagues could not have investigated how the silencing of beltless would influence the effects of fluoxetine in fruit  flies , their project lost momentum and was abandoned.

New life may be breathed into these old studies by recent developments that are searching for the human counterpart of the beltless gene and its possible role as a target for fluoxetine-like drugs. Improved annotation and recent characterization of the fruit  fly  genome revealed that the sequence of the beltless gene corresponds to a gene that had previously been predicted based on mutation studies and called drop-dead. Hence, beltless and drop-dead appear to be the same entity and are related to the worm nose resistant to fluoxetine.

Drop-dead mutant  flies  are initially normal but after some days, they begin to show deficits in flight, develop brain lesions, and rapidly die. The main deficit caused by the drop-dead mutation takes place in the white brain cells (glia). It was suggested that this gene normally produces proteins necessary for maintenance of the adult brain. This maintenance is often called neuroplasticity. Neuroplasticity is usually compromised during aging and may lead to neurodegeneration. Fluoxetine-like drugs are known to be capable of helping neuroplasticity. Hence, nose resistant to fluoxetine may be pointing to a new target for the action of antidepressants; a drop-dead-mediated neuroplasticity.



Source by Hari Manev

Of Worms, Flies, and Antidepressants

You may think that scientists know everything there is about antidepressant drugs such as Prozac or fluoxetine (its generic name). After all, these drugs have been around for a while. Fluoxetine-like antidepressants are known for their selective inhibition of proteins called serotonin transporters, which sequester the active neurochemical serotonin back into cells (thus the term SSRI or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor). Surprisingly, it is still debatable whether this molecular activity of SSRIs is solely responsible for their therapeutic effects. Hence, molecular research typically conducted in a Petri dish or in experimental animals including worms (C. elegans) and fruit  flies  (Drosophila melanogaster) has been looking for alternative explanations.

Worms and fruit  flies  have proved useful whole-organism models for genetic research. More recently, these tiny animals have started to provide us with hints on the genetic mechanisms of human brain disorders and have become increasingly useful in the search for new molecular targets in drug discovery.

Some ten years ago, a group of geneticists stumbled upon the notion that Prozac makes worms wrinkle their noses. These scientists tried to find the molecular reason for this unexpected action of the drug. It turned out to be a gene family, which when mutated diminished the nose muscle contractions caused by Prozac. They named the gene family nose resistant to fluoxetine, or NRF. Scientists hoped that by identifying the proteins made by the worm NRF genes they would be able to find a corresponding human protein, which they could investigate as a new target of Prozac’s action, a target different from the already known serotonin transporter. Unfortunately there was no known human counterpart.

Dr. Svetlana Dzitoyeva from the University of Illinois at Chicago noted similarities between the DNA sequence of NRF genes and a sequence found in fruit  fly  DNA. She and colleagues hypothesized that this fruit  fly  DNA sequence could be a gene similar to NRF. If they could identify that fruit  fly  gene, they might be able to pinpoint its human counterpart and possibly discover a new target for antidepressant action.

Active genes make gene-specific messenger RNAs; these mRNAs lead to the production of corresponding proteins. Dzitoyeva and colleagues have developed a method for identifying new active genes in which they inject anesthetized fruit  flies  with molecules called dsRNA. These dsRNA molecules can be designed to destroy any particular mRNA. As a result, the injected  fly  loses its targeted endogenous mRNA. For all practical purposes, this treated  fly  would behave as if the corresponding gene was inactivated. Looking at the cellular or behavioral consequences of such gene silencing, scientists can tell what the function of the corresponding gene would be.

Dzitoyeva and colleagues designed a dsRNA against the fruit  fly  sequence similar to the worm nose resistant to fluoxetine and succeeded in finding a functional new fruit  fly  gene. They saw its activity in different tissues including the  fly  brain. Silencing this gene in  fly  embryos created a loss of developmental markers know as belts. So they named the new gene beltless.

Unfortunately, fruit  flies  differed from worms in that they did not have any obvious behavioral responses when given Prozac. There was no  fly  behavior that would correspond to the Prozac nose twitches in worms. Since Dzitoyeva and colleagues could not have investigated how the silencing of beltless would influence the effects of fluoxetine in fruit  flies , their project lost momentum and was abandoned.

New life may be breathed into these old studies by recent developments that are searching for the human counterpart of the beltless gene and its possible role as a target for fluoxetine-like drugs. Improved annotation and recent characterization of the fruit  fly  genome revealed that the sequence of the beltless gene corresponds to a gene that had previously been predicted based on mutation studies and called drop-dead. Hence, beltless and drop-dead appear to be the same entity and are related to the worm nose resistant to fluoxetine.

Drop-dead mutant  flies  are initially normal but after some days, they begin to show deficits in flight, develop brain lesions, and rapidly die. The main deficit caused by the drop-dead mutation takes place in the white brain cells (glia). It was suggested that this gene normally produces proteins necessary for maintenance of the adult brain. This maintenance is often called neuroplasticity. Neuroplasticity is usually compromised during aging and may lead to neurodegeneration. Fluoxetine-like drugs are known to be capable of helping neuroplasticity. Hence, nose resistant to fluoxetine may be pointing to a new target for the action of antidepressants; a drop-dead-mediated neuroplasticity.



Source by Hari Manev

Fishing To Be Added As Winter Olympic Event In 2010

The Winter Olympics….

Once again the fishing world has been ignored.

As I sit watching a spine tingling, heart thumping, always tension packed Olympic Curling event competition, I can’t help but wonder why a fishing event has never been represented in the Olympics.

What are they trying to say?

Are they saying that there is no athletic prowess involved when trying to flick a #12 Adams to a 20 inch ring created by the kiss of an 18 inch Rainbow trout!

Is the firing of a high powered rifle after skiing around on a pair of wooden planks any more demanding than fording a riffle packed stream and tossing a chunk of powerbait deftly into the “honeyhole” pocket containing an 8 inch stocker?

I see no difference.

But then I’m an idiot.

Or am I? Let’s at least take a look at some future options for the winter Olympics, that can finally give the fisherman his due when it comes to skill and athleticism….

1) What event shows stamina and grit more than ice fishing? I propose a winter Olympic event that is comprised of ice fishing. In this event, contestants will be timed on their ability to saw a hole in 8 to 10 inches of a frozen lake surface, run in sneakers across the frozen ice to a designated staging area where they will grab up a rod, and stool, and sprint back across the ice to the open hole, bait up, and sit for hours in a fierce northern wind. The athlete then will hopefully, eventually catch a fish, pull his fish from the ice hole, drop it in a bucket, and sprint again across the ice, into a 1975 Ford pick- up truck, drive across the finish line to the cheers, flag waving,and cow bell jingling of his fellow countrymen.

More challenges? Perhaps a couple of fellas name Swen and Ole can sit across from the contestant and constantly be throwing a verbal barrage of “You Betcha’s” and “Don’t ya know’s” at the athlete, as he or she agonizingly attempts to coax a fish out of the water.

Talk about grit!!

Of course the Norwegian contingent might not have a problem with this and be at a decided advantage.HOW do you say “you betcha” in Norwegian anyway?

We will all watch as the hole starts to skim over with ice,and the athlete frantically chips away at the hole to keep it ice free.All the while precious time clicks away as the fish only nibbles at the bait.

They can even hold this event indoors at the Olympic Hockey or Figure Skating venues. It might even make the hockey games more interesting with a few holes in the ice, and figure skating?PLEASE… a double axle into a gaping hole in the ice will add more excitement than Tonya Harding and Nancy Kerrigan living in the same trailer park. Or they can leave a few frozen fish on the ice to help add to the Olympic ambiance.

The events could also easily be held as a “two man” competition with one athlete fishing, while the other builds an ice shack.

If the extreme thrill of the Downhill is your cup a tea, imagine if they hold the event on thin melting ice. The now famous runs of Franz Klammer and Hermann Maier will pale in comparison to the crackling of ice beneath the ice fisherman’s stool as he scrambles for shore before disappearing into the frigid waters.

Talk about the agony of defeat….

2)Boat Slalom. Never mind the luge, bobsled, or skeleton(which at first glance appear to require the two major athletic skills of courage and alcohol), try standing up in a drift boat while running a classIV rapid with a 40 pound salmon stripping line off of your reel, hell bent for return to the ocean. Yes, athletes in ten layers of clothing including the mandatory flannel outer jacket, will try to stay afoot while “the driver” navigates the boulder choked channel of a stream. Not only are the contestants timed in this event, but style points are given for the degree of difficulty the athlete shows while doing “gunnel grabs”, “spins”, and the ever popular “aerials”. Throw in a number of slalom gates, and you have the making of an event made for television. Fall in or lose your salmon, and it’s sorry Charlie–see you in four years.

“OOOHHH, tough break Vern–Elwood has been training all his life for this moment, and to see it all go overboard in one instant is heartbreaking….”

3) No offense to our Canadian friends north of the border, but –CURLING!!! CURLING!! A combination of bowling on ice and a group of shop keepers trying to keep the storefront spiffy.

Gawd, the winters must be awful up there.

Outside of the obvious “sex appeal”of the Olympic Curling

events, the only thing more thrilling would be to watch Dick Cheney go quail hunting.

But, given that there is a place on the podium for chiseled curling athletes, I’m sure we could find a spot for the skilled athleticism of the Winter   Fly  Tying Team !

This event would obviously be dominated by the American squad, which has trained year round in a meat locker in Detroit. Size #28 midge after miserable size #28 midge, the Americans have relentlessly been training, by tying these little buggers to 8x tippet–in a meat locker kept at 14 degrees below zero.

That’s minus 26 celsius for our European competitors.

There at the Olympic  Fly  Tying arena, in frigid weather, teams of  fly  tiers will take to the vice, and tie up various flys. We will watch pained expressions and complete intense concentration as athletes try to get their fingers to work in the icy cold. We will hold our breath as they try to get the hackle and dubbing just right. Precious time will tick away as they blow on their hands, and we watch split screen images of just where the Olympic hopefuls lost time along the way.

Of course,in this two day event, athletes will be judged on speed, style,difficulty, and the ability to catch and release fish.

So, here’s to the athletes of the XX th Olympiad, and I will see you fishing rod in hand, in Vancouver in 2010.



Source by A.J. Klott

Hooks Used Fishing For Sailfish

One of the first and definitive moves that the authorities made in their policy towards sport fishing for billfish in Guatemala was the early adoption of circle hooks, and the banning of “J” type hooks for conventional fishing.This policy combined with a strict ban on killing billfish within the territorial waters of Guatemala has resulted in a renowned and sustainable billfish fishery off the Pacific Coast of Guatemala.

Although it is difficult to police given the resources of the coastal patrol vessels, it is peer enforced by both the sportfishing industry and the commercial fishing operations in the waters. The longliners operate outside the territorial waters and so are more difficult to enforce – but certainly the ban within the patrolled waters has given the fishery off Guatemala a distinct advantage over neighboring countries.

This was based on a substantial amount of data that has demonstrated dramatically lower mortality rates when using circle hooks (2%) versus standard J hooks (almost 50%). This data has held true also for Guatemala when studies have been done by the sportfishing fleet using circle hooks. J-hooks in the past have been utilized for conventional fishing – casting plugs, trolling and bait fishing.When fishing with these type of hooks, it is usually necessary to “set” the hook using a strong upward movement of the fishing pole which conducts a strong force down to the hook and so drives the point and the barb in to any available soft tissue.

As a consequence, if the fish has taken the bait past the bony elements of the outer mouth, there is a high probability of the hook catching and setting in soft tissue deep within the fish’s gut or even in or close to vital organs.In the case of circle hooks however, instead of “setting” the hook by jerking the rod, the angler must apply steady pressure to the line, bringing it in slowly but steadily. If the angler jerks the rod to set the hook, the hook will often pull out of the fish’s mouth and the angler will lose the fish. This is a technique that is somewhat counter-intuitive, and when faced with the thrill of a large billfish at close quarters is often easy to forget in the heat of the moment!

There are two basic types of circle hook available to fishermen and commercial fishing boats in Guatemala, the offset and non-offset. The latter have been used for over 20 years in the commercial Central America and Guatemalan longline industry – as obviously in the vast majority of cases the fishermen are not present when the fish is actually taking the bait, and so they found and developed a hook that was capable of self-hooking on a consistent basis in the rich fishing territory off the coats of Costa Rica and Guatemala. It was found that circle hooks and J-hooks displayed similar catch rates, but that 98% of fish were caught in the jaw with circle hooks.

Offset circle hooks however, carry a much higher mortality rate than non-offset circle hooks, as the offset itself leads to many of the problems associated with “J” type hooks – specifically having a propensity to catch and penetrate any soft tissue that it comes into contact with.A study by the Marine Resources Research Institute shows the deep-hooking rate of offset circle hooks is 23%, significantly higher than non-offset circle hooks and also have a mortality rate approaching that of “J” type hooks.

We have also moved away from “J” type hooks for our Guatemala fly-fishing rigs, essentially for the same reasons – now preferring to use beak hooks.

The “upturned beak” hooks have a little something in common with circle hooks that is worth mentioning here. Aside from the positive hooking mortality benefits that have made circle hooks so popular, they were also designed to pretty much work on their own in finding a soft spot to sink into, thus making hook setting not only unnecessary, but, counterproductive.

Using either style of hooks should always come with some very basic though counter-intuitive instructions (but it usually doesn’t).The hooks with the “upturned beaks” share the same flaws/advantages (glass half full or glass half empty) as their circle hook relatives. This is where some changes in hook setting technique are required.

Setting the hook, especially aggressively, with this style hook will almost surely make the hook slide and miss initially, and oftentimes into a place where it’s being firmly held by the strong grip of the sailfish and not embedded in the fleshy parts. It actually feels like you’ve stuck the fish well in most instances. However, a gradual tightening of the line with steady pressure almost always lets the hook find its mark. It’s the same with “J” style hooks, however, the advantage in sharpness out of the box goes to today’s upturned beak style hooks, and, they almost never straighten out based on the physics



Source by Kevin Styles

New Year Resolutions… For Fish!

Sure, every year it is the same ol’ thing–fishermen sit down crack open a bottle of Hamms, and rattle off the same resolutions they have been rattling off for years.

Do more   fishing , learn to actually tie a  fly-correctly – or break down and take that trip of a lifetime you have been promising yourself for the last three decades.

For the fish, our little water dwelling friends, it is a little different.

Do they get together and crack open a nice warm can of “Mayflys”, (from the land of murky baubles!) and swear off salmon eggs for the rest of their lives?

Let’s take a look at what’s transpiring beneath the riffles as we head into the new year…..

“Hey Buck, looks like we made it another year out here in Snagville.”

“Yeah, it sure has been a rough year–Finley.”

“Tell me about it. I’ve kept having these recurring lip pains all year, seems to happen every few weeks, whenever I eat too much.”

“I got the same problem. Next year I swear I am going to lose some weight, stop eating so much meat and cheese. Especially worms those things are loaded with calories.”

“You know Buck, I heard about this new fad diet a few of the guys have been trying, they say it works real good.”

“Oh yeah, what is it Finley?”

“It’ called the ‘Swim-Fast’ diet.”

“SWIM-FAST, that’s not new, that’ been around for years. I tried that back in 99-just wound up using it to wash down my salmon eggs, and gained nine ounces.”

“I even tried the ‘AtFins’ diet–the one where you eat nothing but caddis flys– but my cholesterol went up so high, I started overproducing my Omega-3’s.”

“Whoa, that can be dangerous.”

“The best one I found was this diet they call the ‘South Beach’ diet–but our river runs north to south– so I never could find a south beach.”

“That can be a problem. Hey, pass me the clam dip.”

“Maybe we should just exercise more?”

“No way- I knew this fish named Sal, I think his last name was Monella–anyway, he decided to go on this big exercise ‘adventure’, stayed away three years. Came back rock hard, bigger than I ever remember him, croaked a few months after getting back.”

“Wow, that sucks.”

“It wasn’t pretty either, he got all white and sore looking, then just went belly up.”

“There was some rumours he was using FGH-you know- the Fish Growth Hormone.”

“Nah, my cousin knew Sal, said he just really grew on his big ocean adventure.”

“Guess exercise isn’t all that good then–hey, try this algae it’s delicious.”

“Ya know Finley, it seems like a lot of our friends have been disappearing lately.”

“I know Buck, they got that same shooting pain in their lip–seemed like they were in a real hurry to get out of here after that–and then they never came back.”

“Friends can be fickle.”

“Yeah, they come and go–but new ones always seem to show up.”

“We got any more “Mayflys”?”

“You just drank the last one.”

“Shoot, I ‘ve also got do a little less drinking in 2006. My wife won’t spawn with me anymore-says I always smell like a drowned worm.”

“I hear ya man. Wife’s always on my dorsal about that kinda stuff too.”

“Anyway, I love ya man–at least you and I will always be best fins. Right?”

“Easy dude, I think you may have had one to many ‘Mayflys’. You’re getting sappy on me.”

“Well, the waters getting pretty brown Finley. Must be getting pretty close to the New Years.”

“Water’s rising too, Buck. I bet your right.”

” Here’s to a great 2006 Finley.”

“Happy New Years, Buck.”

“Guess I’ll head home, back to ‘cut bank'”

“Buck, you’re in no condition to swim I’ll call ya cab.”

“Thanks, Fin”………………..



Source by A.J. Klott

10 Most Dangerous Fish to Eat

The area of the East Coast of Florida where I live is currently being polluted by a vile blue/green algae that is killing the local fish and stinking to high heaven. It has the consistency of guacamole and is caused by runoff contaminants flowing from Lake Okeechobee. This algae is not only getting the fish sick, but also the people exposed to it. This is a reoccurring problem seems to happen every year that south Florida gets above average rainfall levels. Whatever the cause is, it is certainly not good for our fishery, our health and may result in millions of tourism dollars that will be lost if the problem is not resolved soon.

This pollution problem got me to thinking about the various fish that may live through the pollution in their environment and pass those pollutants onto us fish loving, seafood eating enthusiasts.

Some time on the internet allowed me to come up with some of the most toxic fish that are swimming in our local area. The main contaminant in the fish mentioned below is mercury. Mercury is very poisonous to humans and accumulates in predatory fish as they prey upon other contaminated species of fish. As we eat the contaminated fish this mercury accumulates in our bodies as well.

Mercury has many deleterious effects upon humans. The 3 most serious are:

• Brain damage

• Liver damage

• Kidney damage

The fish that tend to have the most mercury in their tissue are listed below. These fish include:

• Kingfish (king mackerel)

• Cobia

• Sharks

• Albacore tuna

• Spanish mackerel

• Marlin

• Swordfish

• Bluefish

• Tilefish

• Amberjacks

There are still some delicious fish out there that typically do not have high mercury levels. These fish include:

• Dolphin (mahi)

• Flounder

• Vermillion Snapper

• Tripletails

• Triggerfish

The fish mentioned in this article are not necessarily bad to eat in moderation. Just like with most things in life moderation is the key to health. This article was meant to be looked at as a public service notice to those of us that eat a lot of fish. If you love to eat king mackerel, you still can but maybe eating it every day would be a bad idea.

Another thing that should be taken into consideration is that fact that fish are typically high in selenium. Selenium actually breaks down mercury in the body. This is probably why eating high mercury fish in moderation typically doesn’t cause too many health problems for most people.



Source by Mike Smith

Why Pharmacists Love Fishing

Fishing is a very old form of recreation.

Actually, it was meant to be a form of subsistence,but men quickly found out that everyday chores like cleaning sabor toothed tiger rugs and starting fires, could easily be avoided while lazily floundering at sea-well out of the earshot of Mrs. Cro Magnonson.

One way you can tell that fishing is very old,is by the vocabulary and words that were formed to describe the acts of fishing.

Let me explain.

Words like “fish”, “net”, “worm”, “bait”, “row”, “carp”, “hook”, “boat” and so on are words that we use to describe fishing.

Much like having an account at your local bank that reads number “0124”–the use of three and four letter words must have been used early on in the timeline of the”word forming process”. So, just like being an early customer of that bank with a low account number, the two or three cavemen that sat down around the ring of fire and started forming guttural sounds to help describe actions, obviously tried to keep the syllables to a minimum, and then progress into multi syllable words as language moved forward.

Why work harder than you had to?

“Grog” might have pointed to that “thing” in the water and grunted out “FFHHIISSHH”.

Lo and behold, that “thing” became a “fish”.

OK– that may not be the most accurate depiction of how words were created, but you still get the point, that it would make sense that the less complicated words of language must have emerged early on , in the communication process.

Good thing too, because by nature, fishermen don’t communicate much.

In fact many of the same guttural sounds uttered by early man, are still used today, especially when fishing.

“Beer”

“Huh?”

“Beer!”

“Here”

“Thanks”

And that is a rather chatty session.

Sometimes, it’s just “odd body sounds” that help make up a good heart to heart fishing buddy chat.

But that’s another topic.

Enter the pharmacist.

Modern medicine and it’s seemingly endless discovery of new wonder drugs, is obviously a modern day phenomenon. Sure, they used to be called “drugs”,(and again keeping with the one syllable- been around along time theory) which was easily grunted out and then administered after the “medicine mans” lengthy disco fire dance and ritual.

Now, they are called “pharmaceuticals”.

Whoa, that alone ought to tell you these things haven’t been around very long.

Maybe it was early man’s propensity for wacky ritual and lengthy fire dance,before sending the patient into his herb induced hallucination, that evolved into today’s lengthy names for “pharmaceuticals”.

Kind of a disco fire dance with words, before treating Grog’s hemmorhoidal itch.

Names like:Esomeprozole magnesium, Acetaminophen, aminoglutethimide,carbidopa levodopa, medroxyprogesterone,and my personal favorite,Desogestrelethinylestradiol.

Try running those through your spell check!

Or, if you happen to be a Cro Magnon-try gruntin’ one of those words out of your larynx.

Could you imagine having a nice twenty five inch rainbow trout laying broadside next to the boat and having to ask for the Fluticasone Propionate, so you could get your Propylthioracil Lederele on board.

That’s enough to give a fisherman gastroesophogeal reflux disease.

I don’t know about your pharmacist, but my pharmacist is a man of few words-AND IT IS NO SMALL WONDER!!

After a day of flutacusamotapheneolathenes, and arythamythaprophalactix, –“hello” and “thanks” are about all the poor chap can muster up.

Just like the plumber who most certainly has no interest in replacing a washer in his own faucet, the last thing a pharmacist wants to do when he gets home is use multisyllabic words.

If we are only given so many syllables in this lifetime, a pharmacist would hate to have spent his allotment on Mrs. Weinstein’s festering Histoplasmosis.

So. “Dave”, my pharmacist, goes   fly   fishing .

And I’ve got to think, that “Dave”, couldn’t have helped being drawn to this simplistic recreational pastime we call  fishing , in part because all he needed was a “rod”, “reel” and “ fly “.

It doesn’t get much simpler than that.It’s like dropping into a soothing tub of monosyllable words.

Anything more would be a real cause for using hydrochlorothorizide…..



Source by A.J. Klott

Solo Fishing

Having grown up in the flat lands of the south all I fished were lakes. My parents had a couple acres on a lake and I spent my formative years fishing for large-mouth bass and blue gill. My methods must have seemed primitive by many people’s standards. I started off with a cane pole fishing with worms then switched to a spinning rod using artificial bait. I’d spend hours each day standing with the lake hoping a fish would take.

When I took up fly fishing, the approach to fishing rivers just seemed to make sense to me, despite never having actually fished a river. One of the advantages of fly fishing that I have found is that I get to spend much of my time on rivers rather than lakes. With rivers, I can look at the surface and surmise what is going on with the structure of the river bottoms. When you combine that with basic understanding of the habits of trout it’s pretty easy to figure out where they hold but catching them is another story. On the other hand, in a lake, the fish could be anywhere. The entire lake is their hideout.

Rivers have another benefit for me in that they give me an opportunity to be more mobile. I get to walk up, down, and through rivers all day long without having to fishing the same section from the same angle twice which for someone with ADD is a huge advantage. I used my freedom liberally to roam and in the less populated areas of Oregon, I grew to love the solitude that was now synonymous with fishing. I never really had to share my beloved river. I could spend all day fishing, have my choice of holes and, rarely would I see another person.

When I moved to Denver, Colorado, it was a different story. As it turns out, there are quite a lot of people there who also enjoy fishing. I would try going during the middle of the week, but that didn’t seem to make a difference in the number of people out there. I also tried going to rivers that were out of the way, but I guess people in CO like to road trip and hike since there always seemed to be people there.

One day I decided to fish the Cheesemen Canyon stretch of the South Platte, one of the most well know rivers in CO. It was a Tuesday, there was a 45 minute hike to the river, and it was a wonderful combination of rain/sleet/snow. Surely this would be my opportunity to have some alone time with the river. Nope.

In a last ditch effort I decided to give high altitude lakes a shot. Maybe this could be my new thing. I’d get up extra early, spend all day hiking, and by the end of the day I was alone with a body of water that was teaming with trout.

So here I’ve come, full circle, back to fishing on lakes… by myself!



Source by Richard Templeton